Practice Sustainability

Sustainability

Sustainable innovation has been a founding principle of the practice, and is fully integrated into our designs and business processes. From designing the first zero carbon home to delivering the greenest office building in the Middle East, our track record of improving the efficiency of buildings and spaces is significant and far-reaching.

Our approach to design is driven by the fundamental belief that sustainability should not compromise function or beauty. Good design should be informed by an ambition to improve efficiency and reduce the building’s carbon footprint and consequently the impact on climate change.

No building, space or place can be considered well designed if it does not positively contribute to environmental, social and economic sustainability. Our design process is robust but flexible to allow a bespoke response to a client brief and context. Our experience and belief in the value of sustainable design enable an intuitive response, which is supported by a rigorous process that harnesses the benefits of BIM and performance analysis.

The practice’s design process is not limited to targeting specific green credentials, but instead pushes the boundaries of performance and efficiency of the built environment. We measure our carbon footprint and feed post-occupancy data back into the design process, providing measured design solutions for our clients.

Annually, the practice calculates its own carbon emissions and follows an environmental programme to set targets for improving the efficiency of our offices year-on-year. Recent calculations show that London and Manchester's annual carbon emissions are equivalent to:

Gross* = 0.7717 tCO2e

Net** = 0.3058 tCO2e

*Gross emissions (Location based emissions) calculates tCO2e using the UK electricity average grid factor.

**Net emissions (Market based emissions) uses the renewable energy carbon factor and deducts the emissions saved from the gross figure. This takes into account our purchase of green energy.


Designed by ID:SR, Deloitte’s 270,000ft² addition to its London campus embraces agile working and an intelligent building system to drive efficiencies and set new standards for wellness and sustainability, becoming the largest WELL Gold, New and Existing Interiors project worldwide, and the first to achieve both BREEAM Outstanding and WELL Gold.

Designed by ID:SR, Deloitte’s 270,000ft² addition to its London campus embraces agile working and an intelligent building system to drive efficiencies and set new standards for wellness and sustainability, becoming the largest WELL Gold, New and Existing Interiors project worldwide, and the first to achieve both BREEAM Outstanding and WELL Gold.

Sheppard Robson’s Hardman Square Pavilion features an expressed timber frame, which anchors the new building in its context of commercial offices and creates a relationship between the building and landscaping. The use of Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT) for the framing mitigates environmental impact due to its low embodied energy, in contrast to other building materials such as steel or concrete.

Sheppard Robson’s Hardman Square Pavilion features an expressed timber frame, which anchors the new building in its context of commercial offices and creates a relationship between the building and landscaping. The use of Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT) for the framing mitigates environmental impact due to its low embodied energy, in contrast to other building materials such as steel or concrete.

Sheppard Robson hosts an annual Green Week programme of sustainability events to give us more time to consider the impact our work has on the environment and how design can more effectively engage with the increasingly pertinent issue of climate change. The initiative was recently recognised as the best sustainability-focused employee engagement programme by the Camden and Islington Sustainability Awards.

Sheppard Robson hosts an annual Green Week programme of sustainability events to give us more time to consider the impact our work has on the environment and how design can more effectively engage with the increasingly pertinent issue of climate change. The initiative was recently recognised as the best sustainability-focused employee engagement programme by the Camden and Islington Sustainability Awards.

The Sheppard Robson-designed Lighthouse was the UK’s first net zero-carbon house. The design set the precedent for homes where innovative environmental systems and construction methods do not compromise the quality of the occupants’ life, but add to it—creating adaptable, flexible spaces designed for sustainable modern living.

The Sheppard Robson-designed Lighthouse was the UK’s first net zero-carbon house. The design set the precedent for homes where innovative environmental systems and construction methods do not compromise the quality of the occupants’ life, but add to it—creating adaptable, flexible spaces designed for sustainable modern living.

Citicape House, a hospitality-led, mixed-use project, is characterised by the largest green wall in Europe (40,000ft²), creating a distinctive architectural addition to a gateway City of London site, while absorbing eight tonnes of pollution annually and setting the standard for urban greening in London.

Citicape House, a hospitality-led, mixed-use project, is characterised by the largest green wall in Europe (40,000ft²), creating a distinctive architectural addition to a gateway City of London site, while absorbing eight tonnes of pollution annually and setting the standard for urban greening in London.

Participants from Sheppard Robson’s offices across the UK will taking part in demonstrations in support of global climate action and demanding an end to the age of fossil fuels.

Participants from Sheppard Robson’s offices across the UK will taking part in demonstrations in support of global climate action and demanding an end to the age of fossil fuels.

The Jicwood Bungalow, designed in 1944, utilised  innovative stressed timber skin from the aircraft industry and a prefabricated concept to deliver fast, efficient housing in response to the social needs of the time—an ethos which continues to characterise the aims of the practice today.

The Jicwood Bungalow, designed in 1944, utilised innovative stressed timber skin from the aircraft industry and a prefabricated concept to deliver fast, efficient housing in response to the social needs of the time—an ethos which continues to characterise the aims of the practice today.